Olympia Summer Seminars 2012

CYCLE A: The Transformation of Conflict

July 5-16, 2012

Course Description

The study of conflict has made tremendous strides in the past two decades: new tools and new perspectives have advanced our understanding of its causes, dynamics, and consequences. In particular, the rigorous empirical and theoretical study of the various forms of conflict and political violence has gained considerable traction. The objective of this course is to review the evolution of this field, in a way that is simultaneously sophisticated, and accessible. In exploring the intersection of large-scale collective action and political violence, we will draw from several disciplines: primarily political science (including both subfields of international relations and comparative politics), but also history, sociology, and economics. We will discuss historical, quantitative, and experimental approaches that have been deployed in the study of conflict and we will examine a broad cross-section of topics, including the causes and dynamics of civil war, ethnic conflict, mass violence, genocide, riots, and terrorism; and the logic of rebel group formation, cohesion, and performance. Our geographic focus will be broad, reflective of the faculty’s diverse expertise. At the end of the course, students will have acquired a good grasp of cutting edge research on conflict.

The faculty includes:

  • Erica Chenoweth (Ph.D. Colorado), Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Wesleyan University; Director of Wesleyan’s Program on Terrorism and Insurgency Research
  • Kristine Eck (Ph.D. Uppsala), Assistant Professor, Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University
  • Robert Gerwarth (Ph.D. Oxford), Professor, Department of History, University College Dublin; Director, UCD Center for War Studies
  • Stathis Kalyvas (Ph.D. Chicago), Arnold Wolfers Professor of political science, Yale University; Director of the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence at Yale and author of The Logic of Violence in Civil War

Syllabus

CYCLE B: Religion & International Politics

July 5-10, 2012

Course Description

The idea that religion matters in international politics is no longer a subject of much controversy in academia. Yet, this welcome break from a rather long-standing disciplinary “securalizing” silence/bias has, nevertheless, yielded rather little in terms of robust theorizing on how religion matters to politics at the national, international, and transnational contexts. This cycle offers a survey of the state of the field when it comes to understanding the nexus between religion and politics. Our regional focus will be comparative, with particular emphasis on cases from Turkey, EU, and Greater Middle East. We will examine the role that religious issues play in the practice of international relations and, in particular, their influence on nationalism and identity politics, democratization, international norms, foreign policy, conflict and violence, and peace and negotiation, so as to allow students to leave the cycle with a provocative and rigorous overview of an evolving and fascinating field of inquiry.

The faculty includes:

  • Menderes Çınar (Ph.D. Bilkent), Associate Professor of Political Science, Başkent University
  • Katerina Dalacoura (Ph.D. LSE), Senior Lecturer in International Relations, London School of Economics
  • Stathis Kalyvas (Ph.D. Chicago), Arnold Wolfers Professor of political science, Yale University; Director of the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence at Yale and author of The Rise of Christian Democracy in Europe
  • Dimitris Keridis (Ph.D. Tufts), Associate Professor of International Relations, University of Macedonia.
  • Paschalis Kitromilides (Ph.D. Harvard), Professor of Political Science, University of Athens

Syllabus

 

CYCLE C: Terrorism & Counterterrorism

July 10-16, 2012

Course Description

Terrorism, and our response to it, are among the most compelling of global political issues: they dominate news headlines, public anxiety, and political strategies alike. Yet few attempt to analyze systematically this pressing phenomenon. Surely, no amount of analytical precision will rid us of the existence of terrorism, but if we want to respond effectively to the policy challenge that it poses we need first to respond effectively to its analytical challenge. To this end, the seminar seeks to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art in the study of terrorism, while also debate whether there is a significant continuity or transformation in terrorist behaviour. Topics that will be covered include: the place of terrorism within the broader context of political violence; the causes of terrorism; the inherent difficulties in defining terrorism and compiling reliable data on terrorist attacks; the distinction between ‘old’ and ‘new’ terrorism; the politics of terrorist risk perception; the global war on terror and counterterrorism.

The faculty includes:

  • Erica Chenoweth (Ph.D. Colorado), Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Wesleyan University; Director of Wesleyan’s Program on Terrorism and Insurgency Research
  • Richard English (Ph.D. Keele), Director of the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence (CSTPV) and Bishop Wardlaw Professor of Politics in the School of International Relations, University of St. Andrews
  • Andreas Gofas (Ph.D. Warwick), Marie Curie Fellow, University of Sheffield; Lecturer in International Relations, Panteion University
  • Stathis Kalyvas (Ph.D. Chicago), Arnold Wolfers Professor of political science, Yale University; director of the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence at Yale and author of The Logic of Violence in Civil War
  • Dimitris Keridis (Ph.D. Tufts), Associate Professor of International Relations, University of Macedonia.
  • Harry Papassotiriou (Ph.D. Stanford), Professor of International Politics, Panteion University; IIR Deputy Director

Syllabus

 

CYCLE D: Negotiating Peace

July 10-16, 2012

Course Description

Negotiation has become the most widely used means to manage and resolve conflicts and to make decisions in international affairs. For most of human history, negotiation was considered an “art”, something one was born with – or without – the ability to do well. However, in the last 40 years, scholars and practitioners have studied effective negotiators and negotiation processes, and have distilled analytic frameworks and skill sets that are teachable and learnable. This course will provide an overview of the basic elements of negotiation theory and practice, drawing upon the concepts of distributive and integrative bargaining. The emphasis will be on understanding the processes of negotiation and how they affect outcomes in international and intra-state (inter-group) conflicts. We will then move to more advanced study of the challenges of negotiating in the international political arena. This will include attention to cognitive and psychological barriers to effective negotiation, the effects of intra-party dynamics, negotiating under conditions of power asymmetry, and managing the complexities of multilateral negotiations. Throughout the course, we will be using simulations and case studies to build both analytic and practical negotiating skills.

The faculty includes:

  • Eileen F. Babbitt (Ph.D. MIT), Professor of Practice in international conflict management; Director of the International Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Program, and co-director of the Program on Human Rights and Conflict Resolution at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University
  • Diana Chigas (M.A.L.D. Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and a J.D. Harvard Law School), Professor of the Practice of International Negotiation and Conflict Resolution at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University; Co-director of the Reflecting on Peace Practice program at CDA Collaborative Learning Projects in Cambridge, MA, USA

Syllabus